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January 02, 2023 6 min read

Sharpening a knife with a whetstone is a skill that requires time and practice to master, but with a little patience and the right technique, you can easily sharpen your own knives at home. In this post, we'll go over the steps to sharpen a knife with a whetstone, as well as some tips and tricks to help you get the best results.

Before we get started, it's important to note that sharpening a knife is different than honing a knife. Honing is the process of realigning the edge of the knife, while sharpening is the process of actually removing metal to create a new edge. In general, knives should be honed every time they're used to maintain their sharpness, and sharpened every few months or so, depending on how often they're used.

Now, let's get started!

Step 1: Choose the Right Whetstone

The first step to sharpening a knife with a whetstone is to choose the right whetstone for the job. Whetstones come in a wide range of grits, from very coarse to very fine, and the grit you choose will depend on the condition of your knife.

For very dull or damaged knives, you'll want to start with a coarse grit whetstone (around 200-400 grit). This will remove a lot of material quickly and get your knife back into shape. For slightly dull or slightly damaged knives, a medium grit whetstone (around 800-1000 grit) will do the trick. And for already sharp knives that just need a touch-up, a fine grit whetstone (around 2000-3000 grit) will work best.

It's also a good idea to have a couple of different grits on hand, so you can start with a coarse grit and then move on to a finer grit for the final touches.

Step 2: Soak the Whetstone

Most whetstones need to be soaked in water for at least 15-30 minutes before use. This helps to keep the stone lubricated and prevents it from getting too hot during the sharpening process.

To soak your whetstone, simply fill a container with water and place the stone in it. Make sure the stone is fully submerged, and let it soak for at least 15-30 minutes.

Step 3: Secure the Whetstone

Next, you'll want to secure your whetstone in place so it doesn't move around while you're sharpening your knife. There are a few different ways to do this, depending on the type of whetstone you have.

If you have a flat, rectangular whetstone, you can simply place it on a non-slip mat or towel and use it that way. Alternatively, you can use a knife sharpening holder or clamp to hold the stone in place.

If you have a round, cylindrical whetstone, you'll need to find a way to secure it so it doesn't roll around. You can use a specialized holder that's designed for round stones, or you can get creative and use a couple of rubber bands or a bungee cord to hold the stone in place.

Step 4: Sharpen the Knife

Now it's time to actually sharpen the knife. Start by holding the handle of the knife in your dominant hand and placing the blade on the whetstone at a 20-degree angle.

Use a back and forth motion to move the blade across the stone, applying moderate pressure as you go. Be sure to keep the blade at a consistent angle as you sharpen, and pay attention to the entire length of the blade, not just the tip.

It's important to note that most knives are sharpened at a slightly different angle, depending on their intended use. For example, a chef's knife is typically sharpened at a 20-degree angle, while a paring knife is usually sharpened at a 15-degree angle. If you're not sure what angle to use for your knife, you can check with the manufacturer or do a quick online search to find out.

As you sharpen the knife, you'll notice a burr forming on the edge. This is a thin strip of metal that curls over the edge of the blade and indicates that you've removed enough material to create a new edge. Once you've reached the burr, you can switch sides and repeat the process on the other side of the blade.

It's important to be patient and take your time as you sharpen the knife. Depending on the grit of the stone and the condition of the knife, it may take several passes to fully sharpen the blade. Just be sure to keep the angle consistent and apply moderate pressure as you go.

Step 5: Hone the Knife

Once you've sharpened both sides of the blade, it's time to hone the knife. Honing is the process of realigning the edge of the knife, and it's an important step to ensure that your knife stays sharp for as long as possible.

To hone the knife, you'll need a honing rod or steel. Hold the honing rod in your non-dominant hand and the handle of the knife in your dominant hand. Place the blade of the knife against the honing rod at a 20-degree angle, and use a back and forth motion to stroke the blade down the length of the rod. Be sure to hone both sides of the blade, and pay attention to the entire length of the edge.

Step 6: Test the Sharpness

Once you've sharpened and honed the knife, it's a good idea to test the sharpness to make sure you've achieved the desired result. There are a few different ways to do this, but one simple method is to gently drag the edge of the blade across a piece of paper. If the knife cuts through the paper cleanly and effortlessly, it's sharp. If it tears or drags across the paper, it's not sharp enough and will need more work.

Step 7: Clean and Dry the Knife

After you've sharpened and honed the knife, it's important to clean and dry it before storing it. Wipe the blade down with a clean, damp cloth to remove any excess metal shavings or water, and then dry it thoroughly.

It's also a good idea to oil the blade to protect it from rust and corrosion. You can use a food-grade oil, such as mineral oil or coconut oil, to do this. Simply apply a small amount of oil to a clean cloth, and then use it to wipe the blade down.

Once the knife is clean and dry, you can store it in a knife block or in a sheath to protect the edge.

Tips and Tricks

Here are a few tips and tricks to help you get the best results when sharpening a knife with a whetstone:

  • Start with a coarse grit and work your way up to a finer grit: If you're working with a very dull or damaged knife, it's best to start with a coarse grit whetstone and work your way up to a finer grit. This will help you remove a lot of material quickly and get the knife back into shape.

  • Use a steady, consistent motion: As you sharpen the knife, it‘s important to use a steady, consistent motion and apply moderate pressure as you go. This will help you get a clean, even edge on the blade.

  • Keep the blade wet: To keep the blade and stone lubricated and prevent the stone from getting too hot, be sure to keep the blade and stone wet as you sharpen. You can do this by sprinkling water on the stone periodically or by dipping the blade in water between strokes.

  • Use a light touch: It's important not to apply too much pressure when sharpening a knife. Too much pressure can cause the blade to bend or warp, and it can also wear out the stone faster. Instead, use a light touch and let the weight of the knife do the work.

  • Use the entire surface of the stone: To get the best results, be sure to use the entire surface of the stone as you sharpen. This will help you get a more even edge and prolong the life of the stone.

  • Keep the blade at a consistent angle: It's important to maintain a consistent angle as you sharpen the blade. This will help you create a clean, even edge and prevent the blade from becoming uneven or wobbly.

  • Hone the knife regularly: To keep your knife sharp for as long as possible, be sure to hone it every time you use it. This will help to realign the edge of the blade and keep it sharp.

Conclusion

Sharpening a knife with a whetstone is a skill that takes time and practice to master, but with a little patience and the right technique, you can easily sharpen your own knives at home. By following the steps outlined above and keeping these tips and tricks in mind, you'll be well on your way to sharp, precise cuts every time.

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